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education and jobs and surl celebration and bring to you jesse jackson who will speak to you and how we pay the price for peace in this city. [applause] >> amos, are you presenting me with the quilt? i want my quilt. i want my quilt. i am delighted to be here with you today. so many years ago i met -- dr. king and i went to minnesota and reverend amos was then pastoring in minnesota before the snow chased him to san francisco and knew dr. king and his father and had a class in moore house of seven students. dr. brown and members of the class and knew them before and before then and he brings a lean yaj of struggle to the table every time he speaks with tremendous morale authority and stroke couldn't stop him for fight wg great power. [applause] i want to thank mayor ed lee for convening the family. for all the times we think of leading from the front. often you lead from the center. you have the power to convene the family, to look at a family crisis and think it through, and it figure it out, and if we can get out of our own's self way we might find solutions to a problem that is
's education. people say that federal loans have card caps of $5,000-$7,000 per year. you can only borrow a total of $33,000 for undergrad. but that is not looking at the parent portion of the picture. the parent portion allows you to borrow as much as you need, to fill the unmet need, to pay your child's way to get to a particular school. there is a credit check that is very modest and there is not a check on income. but as costs have grown, perhaps the limits we have had on federal student loans do not meet the needs the students and families are experiencing when they are trying to pay for college. you see the growth in the program where more parents are borrowing from this program. recipients have doubled in the past decade, and they are borrowing more money as well. we thought it was emblematic of the shift in the system. >> would you say the apparent lack of paycheck is one of the most consistent missing pieces? if someone has an income of $10,000 a year, they can take out a loan for $30,000. >> if they do not have a negative credit history, and we could have a larger conversation a
will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccollum, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that something is up and they are usually right. sometimes we go fo
charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
that the education system must instill the value of strong minds and that brings strong change. take your child to school. meet your child's teachers. exchange numbers. turn the tv off at night. take a report card every nine weeks and take your child to religious celebration once a week. most of the violence is from the bottom up, not top down. mothers say something like "i'm going to beat you boy. i'm going to beat you so the police don't have to do it one day". it was their own way of saying get some home training, some home cultivation is a big fact in the social order and we must restore homes but unemployed parents don't do as good job as parents with jobs. i'm all about welfare back to work. there are four steps involved. one the parents must have day care. if you leave the child without day care you're called an unfit parent and are arrested. you need day care. you need transportation and job training and a job. you need those four steps. what gives you an advantage in san francisco with the mayor across the bay and mayor lee here you have leaders that care. we have leaders h
i came home, he does, so and he had all that information because he had an educated family who knew what was happening, knew what he was going through, knew what to look for, and where to send him. very good. mike. well, and i think one of the things was just brought up is, is the other side of a very positive coin, meaning that there are lots of programs out there now in a position to help. but one of the things you hear from veterans and military families over and over again is there is so much out there that they become overwhelmed. there are so many programs, there is so much information that it really becomes a challenge, um, trying to identify what the right channel of support is for their particular issue, their particular problem. kathryn in, in terms of substance use disorder and mental health issues, behavioral health issues, what is important for families to know and, and how can they help the service member? obviously, jen experienced and, and she's not an isolated case. um, well, i think that the most important thing is for people to, as barbara suggested, to get educat
education and remembering general norman schwarzkopf. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. toda
morning. thank you for educating people on your television show. we live in a community where we are experiencing exactly what you're talking about, particularly businesses, and i am talking big businesses. they do not like where the doors are located, or this department over here, and what they are doing is restricting jobs and tax base. i would encourage people to get involved in your institute and fight this because it is not doing anything for the economy or our country. merry christmas to everybody. host: john, thank you for the call. what is the history of the cato institute, founded in 1977? guest: it was founded to promote liberty and economic freedom, starting in san francisco, and then move into washington, d.c. milton friedman admitted the kindle institute has never sold out. we still work for liberty and freedom. i've been working with the cato institute since 1995 and full time since 2007. host: mary, fort washington, maryland. democrat. caller: i would suggest thinking that if you follow all of the problems come at the end of the trail you will find the smiling grin
powell. [applause] we are thrilled to have our local and national education and safety leaders here to discuss the promise neighborhood program and how we promote safety in our schools. i have been a principal and excited and delighted principal in this community for 80 years. i know how hard families work a day in and day out to achieve academically support each other and the community and to make sure our children have six classrooms, said playgrounds -- safe classrooms, safe playgrounds, and save homes to welcome them. this school has been a proud a partner of the thomas neighborhood initiative. i realize some of our struggling students addressing these challenges in the class term alone was not going to be enough to help get them on the path to success and achieve what we know they are capable of in the future. we need to work with a broader coalition of partners to address their needs outside of the classroom, in the home, on the streets in the community. i am so thankful to our founder. [applause] for starting this hard work, they have continued the hard work over the past yea
was six-years old. he was a special education uden hisaren issd a statement. we take great solace that dylan died in the loving arms of his favorite teacher, the special education teacher, anne marie murphy. the teachers in that school, the principal, psychologist, the teachers that die protecting their children, saving their children, comforting their children, those who survived, they are true heroes and they have not received the recognition, in my judgment, that they deserve. i point out that every one of them is a public-school teacher, a group that has been condemned, vilified, and denigrated by all sorts of people. >> do wonderbout ts nes we are making about mental illness and violence. we have had a number of gun violence in the district of columbia where people have been killed by firearms, prince george's county as well. are you suggesting to me that everyone who pulled a trigger is mentally ill? is that the suggestion? >> no. >> in mass killings, if you look at the virginia tech guide, and jared loughner, he was diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic, which you could see
shockckley was 6 years old. he was a spepecial-education uden his p parents issued a statement. we take great solace that dylan died in the loving arms of his favorite teacher, a special- education teacher, , an marie murphy. 52, mother of four. the teachers of that school, the principa psychologist, the teacher that by protecting their children, saving their children, comforting theirir children, those th survived, they arerue heroes. theyave not received the recognition that they deserve. i would point out, everyone of ththem is a public schoolteacher. a group that has been c condemned vilified, and denigrated by all sorts of people. >> i do wonder about this nexus we are making between n mental illness and violence. we have had a number of gun -- violence where people were killed with fire arms, in prince george's county, too. are you suggesting that everyone who pulls a trigger is mentally ill? is that the suggestion? >> no. >> in mass killings, you look at jerry loughner, virginia tech loughner was diagngnosed as a paranoid schizophric, which you could see on day one. i am not sure abou
this stuff also about the educational stuff like the policy-making situations which i'm very interested in. it's a great thing washington, d.c. has all these things and c-span has covered it. >> c-span created by america's cable companies in 1979 luft. >>> president obama meets with house and senate leaders from both parties this afternoon at the white house that meeting is scheduled for 3:00 eastern in the oval office. politico rights leader's side is hopeful there will be a breakthrough on preventing the tax increases and spending cuts scheduled to take effect on january 1st. earlier today senator tom harkin held and even outside of the capitol about the fiscal cliff. he called it a battle for the middle class. we will also hear from congressman chris van hollen and members of advocacy groups. >> are we ready? okay. good morning. all right. good morning. welcome to this cold morning press conference here outside of the senate office building. i am the executive director of network and i am one of them on the bus. we're here to continue the message, grizzlies to find a solution to the eco
as a way to afford a college education, but the real education she received was in iraq where on march 23rd, 2003, her convoy took a wrong turn and was ambushed by iraqis, she was captured and became the first american p.o.w. to be successfully rescued since world war ii. >> on april 1st, 2003, a special army special forces, rescue jumpers, army rangers and navy seals landed in iraq. the mission, to take home jessica lynch. they entered the hospital where she was being held, and found her. >> where do the windows go out to? >> it's okay. >> lynch was suffering from mental distress and severe physical injuries, including several broken bones. within seven minutes of the first american boots hitting the ground, lynch was on a helicopter headed for much needed medical attention. after nine days in captivity, her nightmare was over. >> you're doing wonderful, okay? >> welcome back. >> her rescue-- (applause) >> indeed her rescue launched the news coverage and she was a hero. she says she's not going to take credit for something she tonight do and survived herself simply as a survivor. would yo
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
mother and father through months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond hill georgia and the surroundisurroundi ng areas welcomes matthew home with tears, flags and staff salute. the streets were lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing it has memorial service at the methodist church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout, a local boy scout troop honored him by collecting pens and papers and sending them to mattheus unit map these unit in afghanistan. a dear friend who was involved in the media had a fission and the project began. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film on memorial day 2010. since then with the help of so many volunteers, and i can't name them all, that project has sent over seven tons of school supplies to our soldiers and marines in humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthews small town of richmond hill and outlying city of savannah and their great army bases of ft. stewart and hunter army airfield and the savannah aircard have helped me heal by supporting the
clash joined. and the real education she received was in iraq where in march 23rd, her convoy took a wrong turn and ambushed by iraqis. she was captured and became the first american p.o.w. to be successfully rescued since world war ii . on april 1st, 2003 a special operation raid of u.s. army forces and army rangers and navy seals landed in iraq, the mission to take home private jessica lynch . at 1:00 they entered the iraq hospital and after securing the location they found lynch. >> are you in pain. it is okay, lynch was suffering from mental distress and severe physical energies and within minutes. lynch was on a helicopter headed for much needed medical attention and after nine days in captivity her nightmare was over. >> you are doing wonderful. >> welcome back. >> her rescue. [ applause ] >> her rescue received a lot of news coverage and she was portrayed as a hero. she will not take credit and described herself simply as a survivor. please welcome a hero to me, jessica lynch. so good to have you here. [ applause ] every time i see the video, i get choked up. how old were yo
real innovative and creative with what they're doing in education. we see what they've done in florida to create more choices. in louisiana particularly. forced by hurricane katrina to start a new system, in effect, and they see that more choices and students for parents to choose are helping low-income at-risk kids, minority kids. we can see it working. and it's not political. it's an american idea to give parents more choices to put their children in an environment that they can succeed. it's an idea that works. we can look around the country at states that try to create a more business-friendly environment, not because they're for businesses or for any political reason or they're for special interests, but they know the only way to get jobs and prosperity and create opportunity is to create an environment where businesses can thrive. we make it political here. and we ask our constituents to make choices between employers and employees. but states like texas have created a business-friendly environment with lower taxes and less regulation. they've passed some laws that reduce the ris
? that's ahead. >>> plus, forget about a college education. why the oil fields of america are now attracting the young. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. >>> gold prices closing right now. let's get to bertha coombs. >> gold closing fractionally higher, on track for its twelfth yearly gain, smallest since 2008 because it's been a very tough quarter for gold. despite the fact we've had all these worries, whether it be the fiscal cliff, the election, the situation in europe. nonetheless, gold has just not been the safe haven. this morning, it was industrial metals that got a boost as we saw rallies in asia on hopes that maybe this new regime in china is going to be spending more
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has ground. n.ese are -- has grown a these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for its. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and yo
him to take on this mission, he had already had sort of a graduate level education if you will in howards are fought in the desert and that separated him in many ways from his four star contemporaries who were mainly back in those days focused on fighting the war in europe. >> harris: for people just joining us, general norman schwarzkopf has died. he led operation desert shield and desert storm which were the largest deployments of u.s. forces and equipment since the vietnam war and general scales you just mentioned president george h.w. bush is ailing in the hospital but we have just gotten a statement from the former president and i want to share it with our viewers if you are still with us. the former president says "barbara and i mourn the loss of a true american patriot and one of the great mill tare leaders of our generation. hailing from westpoint. general norman schwarzkopf to me epitomized the service the dallesty creed that served our great nation through this trying natural crises. a good and decent man and a good friend. barbara and i send our condolences to h
of educational progress that statistic comes from. with a lot of prayer one couple decided to put aside fame and fortune and try to turn that statistic around. derrick moore and stephanie perry moore. authors of the lookwood lions series of books. appreciate you being with us today. good to see you. >> thank you. >> thank you for having us. >> i want to hear more about the series of books momentarily. a very broad question we could probably spend hours on. how did we get to the point where 77% of 8th graders are reading below grade level? how did this happen? >> a great question to ask. how did it happen? you said it. kids are doing so many other things nowadays but not spending time taking advantage of their own education. great textbooks and educators and in the best school buildings but you they have to decide internally they want to take advantage of getting their own education. kids aren't finding success and therefore they are not really trying and that is what is making them fail. >> this lockwood lions series of books tries to address the fundamental issue by making reading interesti
the individual, military did education and training? -- education and training? i agree that you have to start at the provincial and district level. which is the right model to go with here? mr. affleck, you talked about 27 different militia types of groups. when we try to focus on couple, which does not -- kabul, which is not extent beyond the city limits. what has to come first for us to be on the track to success? >> it to get international security assistance peace right and you have african nations, including uganda and rwanda and participate, that gives you some breathing space to move on. that is the essential thing that first. to happen first brok >> you have to deal with governments, but obviously creating greater security -- >> governments at which level? "you cannot frankly do real governance of the provisional level with governors unless you're dealing with the capital, because of the nature of the congolese government. you start where you are, and you have monusco, with no real effectiveness, try to bring in units or create a new unit within it that has that capacity. if i were fo
inevitability -- that we withdraw, that they will revert to the punishment of women, failure to educate, and i think that weighs on our conscience. that is not justification for a war. >> i believe i read somewhere that they are talking about giving women a break, the taliban. >> we do not know. if we had left some years ago if al qaeda would have come back. you cannot prove that. >> all right, syria. how did the united states, how did the government, how did the administration handled syria? appropriately? and appropriately? enough? not enough? >> the good thing about the afghanistan and iraq forces that they are keeping us out of syria. >> syria could become a disaster. this is a country with a huge stockpile of chemical weapons, which are pretty active. we have allowed the saudis and qataris to arm the rebels, and those are the people who have armed the islamists, so the islamists now have the upper hand among the rebels. the west -- the british and french and we and the turks -- did not do anything comparable with the non-islamic opposition. we are looking at a possible country that would
without some investment in infrastructure or education and the like, our recovery may falter and then given what is going on in europe and much of the world, that would be bad news. i think the number one job is to keep us on good, sound, fiscal standing and he has to deal with some of these outstanding issues. then you move on and you start to see things like education and how we deal with education in this country and the need for reform continues to be out there. working with the education secretary, it is going to occupy a bitter moment for this president. americans believe in education and of the it is the first step on that ladder to upward mobility. that is going to be a challenge that this president has to deal with them than he has to find these issues and then define them in terms of common ground. host: juan williams joining us on this christmas day. joining us from texas, this is ken. go ahead. caller: good morning. merry christmas. i live in texas. the people in east texas -- i don't mean to say it, but white people really do not like this president. you can list
a foundation that helps troops returning home ret pay for education costs. >> the focus really is on the the men and women, the veterans and the spouses that we provide it's scholarships for and it's about futures men and their futures much more what so than about what happened in the past. marie's >> reporter: but marie's journey also also contains a second love story. she's now remarried to joe shenten, a chicago businessman.ssman. tell me about joe. >> tell >> he is probably the best he i surprise in my life so far. i didn't think that -- i wasn't n't looking to be in another relationship.nk i didn't think that i would ever w find someone like him. and and he is able to embrace all of these things my past my life my l pat and to love all of them and th to love me just for who i am. it's and it's been this great gift t that he's given me. >> reporter: i walked in here i today and joe is wearing a pat and tilman hat. a he still plays a large role in >> your new lives. >> he does. >> >> reporter: and everyone's c comfortable with that? that. >> yeah it's
it, and prove it, but, however, i believe in the next stage that you will see more education to some laws and something, this should not have happened. >> reporter: doesn't look like any media appearances from john or the family just yet. they really want to get him back home, to their home in florida as soon as they can and it looks like it will have to be by car, john isn't in any condition to fly, they say. it took immense u.s. media coverage and pressure from the state department to get the mexican authorities to drop all charges against him. in the end they determined while it was illegal for him to have taken the gun into the the country, he never intended to commit a crime and it appears with the pressure of the the state department, and something of a face-saving compromise for the mexicans in order to get him released. jamie, back to you. >> jamie: on this one, dominic, chained to that bed for four months, that's a crime. we're so happy that johnnie will be home with his family where he belongs and i hope his health holds up, wish him the best. thank you, dominic. >> report
washington. there is so much to be done on jobs, income, education, and energy. we are a week away from one of the worst tragedies in memory. so we have got work to do on gun safety. a host of other issues. these are all challenges we can meet. these are all colleges we have to meet, if we want our kids to grow up in america that is full of opportunity and possibility, as much opportunity and possibility that our parents and our grandparents left for us. but we are only going to be able to do it together. we are going to have to find some common ground. the challenge we have got right now is that the american people are a lot more sensible and a lot more thoughtful, and much more willing to compromise and give and sacrifice and act responsibly, than their elected representatives are. that is a problem. there is a mismatch between how everybody else is thinking about these problems, democrats and republicans up side of this town, and how folks are acting here. we have to get the aligned. and we only have 10 days to do that. i hope every member of congress is thinking about that. nobody can g
bureaucracy could get in the way. >> from for profit education, my money, my future, it's gone. >> reporter: to faulty foreclosures. >> for me they happen quickly. [ wrong tape ] >> that obviously was the wrong story. the city does -- has spent nearly $1 million already this year on police consultants. they hope to help the backlog of internal affairs investigations. william bratton and his security consultant group is scheduled to start in oakland next month. >> is this a one-year deal? it's a contract that they have signed with bratton
education and basic training programs we can help -- lift the congolese army up and get them closer to the standards we want to see in the military, i want to stress that is still a relatively modest investment of our money and time. we find we're able to get a fairly large return on that investment in terms of the output. it is no secret that if we were to seek further defense cuts -- see further defense cuts, we would have to take a close look at all of these. even as modest as the expenditures countrurrently are. >> give that some thought, and if you could get back to us with the record on that, and pull together the best you can the dollars that we're spending. are they adequate? give us some idea of apartheid station. we of got to look at all of that in the grand -- the total spending. >> i would like to ask the panel what you feel like with regard to m23, their ultimate aims. do you feel like they're a threat is subsiding, or it is possible that could lead to a new regional war? >> i will take that question. the m23 is basically a rebel group. how they believe that the terms o
that are on the top are states that educate their young people, states that have taken the issue of obesity and exercise very seriously. the states on the bottom tend to be poorer states but that is not mutually exclusive because you have states like oklahoma and alabama, who have actually moved up in the rankings. so the issue is one of education. accessibility to the better foods, supermarkets coming into neighborhoods. for instance, in certain neighborhoods, there's really a lack of green groceries and mrs. obama has shed a lot of light on that subject, to our credit. and i think that was we go along and we come to understand these are very expensive issues, i mean, obesity costs us $190 billion a year. that is an incredible amount of money, and the other way to look at it is, we use about 1.1 billion gallons, extra of gas lane, owing to obesity. 1% of the gasoline we use is related to obesity. >> heather: it is just not mon taylor, that it is costing. it also costs us in lost time and also lost productivity. >> exactly. but the real problem with obesity is childhood obesity. and we have
in your place of education, in your place where you send your 5, 6, 7-year-old children? is that the message, the sort of society that we want to be? or do we want to take self-defense before the moment of conflict? do we want to look at legislation? do we want to put policies in place that allow us to defend ourselves before we get to a point where we say, i wish that teacher had it. by the time we get to that point, it was too late. >> hailey, were your surprised by the press conference? >> i have been optimistic for the official statement all week, and i have to say i was very disappointed. i think that their statement was a pretty huge disservice to their membership and all, i know wonderful members of the nra who have fantastic expertise, are very smart, are very, could be wonderful resources in this. and i really think that statement did not reflect any sort of an engaging discourse and engaging in dialogue. i was shocked at how much of a monologue it was, actually. >> and there's this emerging idea, and i think it is an emerging idea that's a hopeful idea in liber
educators who were taken from us will be laid to rest. we may never know all the reasons why this tragedy happened. we do know that every day since, more americans have died of gun violence. we know such violence has terrible consequences for our society. and if there is even one thing that we can do to prevent any of these events, we have a deep obligation -- all of us -- to try. over these past five days, a discussion has reemerged as to what we might do not only to deter mass shootings in the future, but to reduce the epidemic of gun violence that plagues this country every single day. and it's encouraging that people of all different backgrounds and beliefs and political persuasions have been willing to challenge some old assumptions and change longstanding positions. that conversation has to continue. but this time, the words need to lead to action. we know this is a complex issue that stirs deeply held passions and political divides. and as i said on sunday night, there's no law or set of laws that can prevent every senseless act of violence in our society. we're going to need to wo
a second wind and this was in the education of general david petraeus by paula broadwell. any comments on those books? >> it is funny refer to that book as a poorly amid this title about a second wind because after general david petraeus administration, that is exactly why her book got the second wind and why the paperback publication was pushed up. what it has done a little bit though is take away from the larger aspect of these books. when scandal rears its head, one focus is too much on that instead of the substance of the book. one thing worth pointing out especially in relation to the mark cohen and mark cohen was a pseudonym for one of the navy seals who was involved in the mission to kill osama bin laden, the book's publisher which is penguin press, they announced with only weeks to spare, i felt they did a very brilliant job of marketing that book. it didn't help or perhaps didn't hurt depending on who you ask that mark owens's real name was dutifully revealed by the media which than cost its own fire storm and the like but the upshot is many of these books with commensurate mi
. arizona's attorney general proposing to change the state law that would allow an educator in each school to carry a gun. the "l.a. times," the city of los angeles collected more than -- this story is unbelievable. they collected more than 2,000 firearms part of a guns for groceries buyback program. 75 assault weapons were included in that and two rocket launchers were turned in for cash. >> they got steak and shrimp for the rocket launchers. what about teachers with guns in classrooms? >> i mean, it's amazing to me. i had randy wine gart ten of the american federation of teachers on my show last night. it's outrageous to me on two levels. one, you're going to put more guns into schools it to try to deal with getting guns out of the school. you don't have money for students. you don't have money for sports and arts. you don't have money for anything you need in school, but you're going to find money to buy guns, bullets and training for teachers? where did the conservatives come up with this money from? how, if you had an armed teacher, would that have solved newtown? it would have made t
the country, parents understandably are scared. educators are concerned about security in schools. let's go to utah where the teachers will be getting weapons training today. and arizona's attorney general plans to have trained or principal trained with a gun inside the school. basically they're not saying they want the teachers to go roaming the halls with a gun. but this is like the last standr classroom. >> clayton: the first response are how are they going to allow guns in utah. in utah, one of the few states that allows guns in public schools, the legislature there had that state's rights, that's how they've done it for years. what the school says to your point, we don't want them roaming the halls, but it's free. we're going to waive a $50 fee on training so if you want to learn how to hold a gun, concealed weapons holder, get more training. the argument from gun advocates is they're much more able to quickly respond should some mad man come into a school than police having a swat team get there five, six, seven minutes later. >> kelly: the same thing holds true for arizona. i know wh
in 2 1/2 years. and barnes & noble chairs rallying over british publishing and education company pearson says it will invest $85.9 million in nook media in exchange for a 5% equity stake. >>> well, houston's port is a big employer and a very busy one, one of the busiest in the world, but it could be stalled by a labor strike that threatens the city, as well as more than a dozen others along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast. annise parker is the mayor of houston. mayor parker, great to have you with us. >> glad to be with you. >> your port handles about 70% of the shipping container business along the gulf coast, so this could be a major blow how will it impact your city, exactly? >> of our nine terminals, two are container terminals, and it will shut those down. 70 to 150 workers will be not showing up to work, will shut down access to those terminals now. we will continue to do business through our other terminals, but it could have a really severe and immediate impact on not just what happens at the port, but this is about cargo moving to other places. so it's everything up
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